Providing tools to assess the needs of Florida's children and their families.

Providing tools to assess the needs of Florida's children and their families.

  • About Florida KIDS COUNT

    The objective of Florida KIDS COUNT (FKC) is to inform Floridians and their policy makers about the quality of life for Florida's children, and to build leadership and accountability for action on behalf of our children. FKC annually updates and disseminates national, statewide and county-level data on key indicators for Florida's children. Read More +
  • 2016 Florida KIDS COUNT County Data Book

    Florida’s growing population ranks us as the third fastest growing state in the U.S. In 2014, we had more than 19 million residents and we will likely have 2 million more by 2020. As part of our efforts, Florida KIDS COUNT has just completed a county-by-county profile data-book providing more information on how to improve poverty levels, education and health outcomes. Read More +
  • Florida KIDS COUNT Data Services

    Florida KIDS COUNT is here to provide you with consistent and reliable data for you to adapt to a variety of uses including policy analysis, grant and proposal writing, needs assessments and public education. Read More +
  • State and National Publications

    Florida KIDS COUNT annually updates and disseminates national, statewide and county-level data on key indicators for Florida's children. Read More +
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New from KIDS COUNT

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  • Partner Profiles

Florida Counties Child Well-being Index (2017)

Each year publicly available data are used to compare the 50 states and provide relative rankings each summer. So we asked ourselves, why can’t we do that with Florida’s counties?

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Florida Counties Child Well-being Index (2017)

Florida Counties Child Well-Being Index Report (2017)

Each year publicly available data are used to compare the 50 states and provide relative rankings each summer. So we asked ourselves, why can’t we do that with Florida’s counties?

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2016 Florida KIDS COUNT County Data Book

Florida KIDS COUNT has just completed a county-by-county profile data-book that provides information on how we can improve poverty levels, education and health outcomes in Florida, while reducing negative risk factors.

 
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It's Your Choice Florida!

Findings from several recent reports reveal that Florida’s children lag behind the nation and other southeastern states in health insurance coverage. Although the rate of uninsured children in the state declined by 25% from 2009 to 2013, Florida still has nearly half a million children without any health insurance coverage.

 

 

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2017 KIDS COUNT Data Book

According to the 2017 KIDS COUNT® Data Book, Florida has made significant strides to improve health insurance coverage for children and families, reducing the amount of uninsured kids by 46 percent from 2010 to 2015. However, during the same period, the state has seen no improvement in the number of children living in poverty and, more worrisome, it has experienced a 17 percent increase in the number of children living in areas of concentrated poverty. 40 percent of Florida children live in households that spend more than 30 percent of their income on housing. Other troubling economic well-being indicators reveal the deep challenges faced by children and families: more than 900,000 children lived in poverty in 2015, over half a million children lived in high-poverty areas, and 31 percent of Florida’s children lived in families where no parent had full-time year-round work. Learn more by clicking the title link.

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2016 KIDS COUNT® Data Book

According to the KIDS COUNT® Data Book from the Annie. E. Casey Foundation, Florida has slipped 3 places in overall child well-being, down to 40th place from 37th last year. The 2016 edition focuses on key trends in child well-being in the post-recession years and measures child well-being in four domains: economic wellbeing, education, health, and family and community.

 
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2015 KIDS COUNTÆ Data Book

The Annie E. Casey Foundation's KIDS COUNT® Data Book shows that while Florida is experiencing positive growth in economic trends, the number of children living in poverty continues to rise. The total number of children living in these families is 969,000 or nearly one in every four. The report also goes on to show that a third of Florida's children are living with parents who lack secure employment.

 

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Florida KIDS COUNT is shining the light on the Early Childhood Council of Hillsborough County, Inc. Opens in a new window as a standout program having significant impacts on young children and families.

"We have to invest early and often in early care and education, in developmental screenings and in other school readiness initiatives if we are going to help children realize their full potential."

Stephen Martaus, Executive Director - Early Childhood Council of Hillsborough County, Inc

Click to Nominate an Agency/Community
 

Each year around this time, the Annie E. Casey Foundation releases its KIDS COUNT Data Book 2016 – State Trends in Child Well-being. This year marks the 27th time that the Foundation has produced state profiles that allow users to directly compare all of the states on sixteen indicators of child well-being and one overall ranking of child well-being. Data is also available for Washington, D.C., Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands, but they are not directly compared to the states.

So how do these state profiles work exactly? Leaving the mathematical details to your reading pleasure (download the report here), the Overall State Ranking is derived from sixteen indicators. The 16 indicators are organized into the following four categories:

Economic Well-Being – This category includes the indicators reflecting the percentage of children who live in poverty, the percentage of children whose parents lack secure employment, the percentage of children living in households with a high housing cost burden, and the percent of teens 16-19 years old who are neither working or in school. These data come from the US Census Bureau’s American Community Survey.

Education – Indicators in this category include the proportion of young children who are not in school, the percentage of fourth graders who are not proficient in reading, the percentage of eighth graders who are not proficient in math, and the number of high school students not graduating on time. These data come from the US Census Bureau’s American Community Survey, the US Department of Education’s National Center for Education Statistics, National Assessment of Educational Progress, and the US Department of Education’s National Center for Education Statistics, Common Core of Data.

Health – This category has the indicators that show the percentage of low birthweight babies, the percentage of children without health insurance, the number of child and teen deaths per 100,000 and the percentage of teens who abuse alcohol or drugs. Date sources are the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics, Vital Statistics, US Census Bureau’s American Community Survey, and the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, National Survey on Drug Use and Health.

Family and Community Indicators – Indicators in this category include the percentage of children in single parent families, the percent of children in families where the head of household lacks a high school diploma, the percent of children living in high-poverty areas and the number of teen births per 100,000. Data sources are the US Census Bureau’s American Community Survey and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics, Vital Statistics.

So now that you know how this works, let’s look at the numbers. This year, Florida ranked 40th overall out of the 50 states. This means we have some work to do to change policies that improve the well-being of our children and families! Beginning in July, we will spend a few months looking at Florida’s rankings on each domain as well as individual indicators. More importantly, we will ask, "What would it take to make Florida #1 nationwide?", for example, how many children would need to be lifted out of poverty for us to rank first? We will also look at the kinds of programs and policies that would need to be adopted or expanded to make this so. I am looking forward to exploring the possibilities with you. To get started, take a minute, download the Data Book and meet me here at our blog in July, join our conversation on Twitter and check on us frequently on Facebook.